The knowledge base for Chinese medicine is incredibly vast.

There are thousands of medical texts which were written in the time span of the Han to the Qing Dynasties.

These books make up the core knowledge of pre-modern Chinese medicine.

Sadly, many of these books have not been translated into English, and there are thousands which never will be.

This is no small feat, as each small to medium text takes a translator at least a year to translate, and larger texts take even longer.

This is a labor of love, born from the desire to read the material that our teachers have read, and to drink from the source.

Our mission is to translate these texts in a literal way.

Most scholars will agree that a literal translation is the starting point for texts where the source material is in a different language.

Once a literal translation has been created, and is on the market, then it is up to our community to tease out the layered meanings within the text.

There are several ways that you the reader can help us reach our lofty goals, which we believe will greatly increase the resources for those interested in Chinese medicine.

First: A subscription to our Chinese Medicine Database helps pay our translators to translate texts which have never been translated before.

The Data within these texts is then searchable in Chinese or in English.

Second: We have published nine books to date, and they are:

Bèi Jí Qiān Jīn Yào Fāng 備急千金要方 Essential Prescriptions Worth a Thousand in Gold For Every Emergency by Sūn Sīmiǎo 孫思邈 (Volume II - IV) Translated by Sabine Wilms Out of Print

The Jīn Guì Fāng Gē Kuò 金匱方歌括 Formulas from the Golden Cabinet with Songs by Chén Xiūyuán 陳修園 (Volume I - III) Translated by Sabine Wilms

The Zhēn Jiǔ Dà Chéng 針灸大成 The Great Compendium of Acupuncture & Moxibustion by Yáng Jìzhōu 楊繼洲 (Volume I) Translated by Sabine Wilms

The Zhēn Jiǔ Dà Chéng 針灸大成 The Great Compendium of Acupuncture & Moxibustion by Yáng Jìzhōu 楊繼洲 (Volume V) Translated by Lorraine Wilcox

The Zhēn Jiǔ Dà Chéng 針灸大成 The Great Compendium of Acupuncture & Moxibustion by Yáng Jìzhōu 楊繼洲 (Volume VIII) Translated by Yue Lu

The Zhēn Jiǔ Dà Chéng 針灸大成 The Great Compendium of Acupuncture & Moxibustion by Yáng Jìzhōu 楊繼洲 (Volume IX) Translated by Lorraine Wilcox

Raising the Dead and Returning Life: Emergency Medicine of the Qing Dynasty Translated by Lorraine Wilcox

The Zhēn Jiǔ Zī Shēng Jīng 針灸資生經 The Classic of Supporting Life with Acupuncture and Moxibustion Vol. I-III Translated by Yue Lu

The Jīn Guì Fāng Gē Kuò 金匱方歌括 Formulas from the Golden Cabinet with Songs by Chén Xiūyuán 陳修園 (Volume IV - VI) Translated by Eran Even

These books can be found at our own store, as well as Amazon, the Journal of Chinese Medicine, Naturmed, and China Books

The purchase of these books helps us continue to translate and offer our community regular releases of never before translated books.

Lastly, tell your friends and peers about us. Only by doing this as a community will we really be able to make a critical mass, where we are able to accomplish a massive amount in our lifetimes!

We appreciate you our users, and our readers. Thank you for visiting out website.




 

 

Past Lectures

 

Chinese Medicine Database Lecture Series

 
32. August 24, 2016 Chinese Medicine Interpretations of Current Psychotherapy Concepts Related to Trauma and Recovery   Proctor: Darren Tellier R.Ac.
Discussed: Chinese Medicine is not unfamiliar with shock as a pathogenic influence. Various contemporary authors and translators have provided analysis of shock in terms of Zang--‐Fu organs systems disharmonies, Elemental disturbance, and Vital Substance damage. These interpretations, while insightful, often do not delineate between the different physiological reactions that are related to shock and trauma; such as the differences between fight, flight, and freeze states.

Current psychotherapy concepts of trauma suggest that the mind--‐body gets “stuck” when traumatic material is unprocessed, creating a state of autonomic dysregulation. Such concepts should compel us to develop Chinese Medicine interpretations of dysregulation and the “stuck” state. For example, is there a specific pattern discrimination that accurately describes the freeze response, or does the body get caught in the state it was in during the initial trauma? How should we quantify and qualify mind--‐body dysregulation, and the stuck state?

This purpose of this presentation is to provide preliminary Chinese Medicine models for these states, as well as promote discussion, debate, and further investigation into shock and trauma.

Darren Tellier is a professor of Chinese medicine at MacEwan University in Edmonton, Canada. He will be giving the following two hour lecture in person, and also will be talking about a topic I am curious about which is: How circadian rhythms are changed with Chinese medicine, what a circadian rhythm change looks like as pathology.
31. July 27, 2016 Yin-yang, Wu-Xing and the Four Seasons in pre-Huangdi Neijing Thought   Proctor: Michael Brown
Discussed: The aim of this lecture is to discuss key concepts to Chinese medicine in pre-Huangdi Neijing texts. Key terms we will discuss are yin, yang, qi, the four seasons, and the five elements. We will discuss a variety of texts such as Guanzi, Huainanzi, Chunqiu Fanlu, and relate them to the concepts in the Huangdi Neijing. The writing that exists prior to the Neijing is the background narrative to the writing of the Neijing. What is discussed in these earlier texts fundamentally influenced the final product which we now know as the Neijing, therefore by reading these documents, we can achieve a deeper level of clarity into the profound part of Chinese medicine.
30. July 10, 2016 The Traditional Roots of Chinese Herbal Alchemy Cultivation and Processing from a Jing Fang Perspective: Di Huang and Fu Zi   Proctor: Tim Ross
Discussed: Focus on 12 of the most commonly used Chinese herbs - Huang Qin, Dang Shen, Huang Qi, Dang Gui, Bai Shao, Gui Zhi, Da Zao, Gan Cao, Gan Jiang, Bai Zhu, Da Huang, and Ban Xia.

For each herb we will detail the following - First Appearance, Archetypical Classical Formula(s), Origin, Production Region, Climate, Soil, Light, Water, Propagation, Field Management, Cultivation length, Harvest, Processing, Major Features of Medicinal Material, and Key Points in Organoleptic Assessment.
29. July 9, 2016 Cultivation, Harvest and Processing of Common Chinese Medicinal Herbs   Proctor: Tim Ross
Discussed: Focus on 12 of the most commonly used Chinese herbs - Huang Qin, Dang Shen, Huang Qi, Dang Gui, Bai Shao, Gui Zhi, Da Zao, Gan Cao, Gan Jiang, Bai Zhu, Da Huang, and Ban Xia.

For each herb we will detail the following - First Appearance, Archetypical Classical Formula(s), Origin, Production Region, Climate, Soil, Light, Water, Propagation, Field Management, Cultivation length, Harvest, Processing, Major Features of Medicinal Material, and Key Points in Organoleptic Assessment.
28. July 6, 2016 The Traditional Roots of Chinese Herbal Alchemy Cultivation and Processing from a Jing Fang Perspective: Di Huang and Fu Zi   Proctor: Tim Ross
Discussed: Di Huang and Fu Zi are featured prominently in the classical formulas. To preserve the traditional structure-function relationships between these herbs and their designated therapeutic targets, it is necessary to preserve the traditional methods for cultivation, harvest and processing of these materials.

To that end, Dr. Ross will present each herb’s earliest appearance in the Ben Cao literature, archetypicalclassical formulas, botanical and geographic origin, modern production regions, climate soil light water requirements, propagation methods, field management, cultivation length, harvest time, post-harvest processing methods, major macroscopic features for identification, key points for organoleptic assessment, historical pao zhi methods, commonly used modern pao zhi methods, reason for and result of pao zhi from both a chemical and therapeutic perspective. All of this material is taken directly from primary Chinese language sources while at the same time being infused with Dr. Ross’ own personal experiences of growing, harvesting, processing and prescribing these herbs.
27. May 25, 2016 Round Table discussion on the Classics with Jonathan Schell   Proctor: Jonathan Schell
Discussed: Chapter 1, Line 1 of the Jin Gui Yao Lue.
26. April 21, 2016 Round Table discussion on the Classics with Eric Brand   Proctor: Eric Brand
Discussed: Farm to Pharmacy Issues of Cultivation and Ecology in Chinese Medicine.
25. March 30, 2016 Round Table discussion on the Classics with Lorraine Wilcox   Proctor: Lorraine Wilcox
Discussed: Nuns, Widows, and Unmarried Girls A Discussion on the Health Effects of Female Celibacy from Ancient Chinese Sources.
24. June 29, 2012 Round Table discussion on the Classics with Subhuti Dharmananda   Proctor: Subhuti Dharmananda
 
23. May 25, 2012 Round Table discussion on the Classics with Brenda Hood   Proctor: Brenda Hood
Discussed Internal Alchemy.
22. April 27, 2012 Round Table discussion on the Classics with Heiner Fruehauf   Proctor: Heiner Fruehauf
 
21. Seattle -- April 10, 2012 Round Table discussion on the Classics with Dan Bensky   Proctor: Dan Bensky
Discussed the San Jiao organ and various view of it through the dynasties.
20. March 30, 2012 Round Table discussion on the Classics with Sabine Wilms   Proctor: Sabine Wilms
Discussed 4 diseases from the Zhu Bing Yuan Hou Lun
19. Seattle -- March 13th, 2012 Round Table discussion on the Classics with Craig Mitchell   Proctor: Craig Mitchell
Discussed Si Ni San and it's location in the Shaoyin section of the Shang Han Lun.
18. February 24, 2012 Round Table discussion on the Classics with David Freierman   Proctor: David Freierman
Discussed Case studies on Hypothyroid disease and Zhu Danxi.
17. Seattle -- February 7th, 2012 Round Table discussion on the Classics with Jason Robertson   Proctor: Jason Robertson
Discussed the Jia Yi Jing and the idea of yì 意, zhì 志, sī 思, lǜ 慮, and zhì 智, and the application of this in a clinical setting.
16. January 27, 2012 Round Table discussion on the Classics with Eric Brand   Proctor: Eric Brand
Discussed granules and the differences between the USA, mainland China and Taiwan.
15. Seattle -- January 10, 2012 Round Table discussion on the Classics with Daniel Altschuler   Proctor: Daniel Altschuler
Discussed the meaning of constraint (yu) in reference to the Liver.
14. November 11, 2011 Round Table discussion on the Classics with Sabine Wilms   Proctor: Sabine Wilms
Discussed: Sun Simiao and his views on Ethics, Nourishing life, and Dietetics.
13. October 28, 2011 Round Table discussion on the Classics with Craig Mitchell   Proctor: Craig Mitchell
Discussed: Cough with case studies.
12. September 30, 2011 Round Table discussion on the Classics with Subhuti Dharmananda   Proctor: Subhuti Dharmananda
Discussed: Herb pairs and triples.
11. June 24, 2011 Round Table discussion on the Classics with Ed Neal   Proctor: Dr. Neal
Discussed: The nine needles of acupuncture intro.
10. May 27, 2011 Round Table discussion on the Classics with Lorraine Wilcox   Proctor: Lorraine Wilcox
Discussed: Time (using stem and branch theory) and medicine.
9. April 29, 2011 Round Table discussion on the Classics with Michael Max   Proctor: Michael Max
Discussed: Progression of disease through the 6 confirmations and use of the Classics in clinical practice.
8. March 25, 2011 Round Table discussion on the Classics with Jonathan Schell   Proctor: Jonathan Schell
Discussed: The Lei Fang, and formulas in general.
7. February 25, 2011 Round Table discussion on the Classics with Craig Mitchell  Proctor: Craig Mitchell.
Discussed the 3 case studies using a single Shang Han Lun formula which treated each of the 3 cases.
6. January 28, 2011 Round Table discussion on the Classics with Subhuti Dharmanda  Proctor: Subhuti Dharmanda.
Discussed the Evololution of Chinese Medicine from the Jin Yuan dynasty to Li Shizhen. Also discussed the Kidney from a TCM perspective.
5. November 12, 2010 Round Table discussion on the Classics with Subhuti Dharmanda  Proctor: Subhuti Dharmanda.
Discussed the Liver from a TCM perspective.
4.October 29, 2010Round Table discussion on the Classics with Arnaud Versluys Proctor: Arnaud Versluys.
Discussed Shang Han Lun and the Jin Gui Yao Lue.
3.September 24, 2010Round Table discussion on the Classics with Jason Robertson Proctor: Jason Robertson.
Discussed Four Level theory and San Jiao theory
2.August 27, 2010Round Table discussion on the Classics with Arnaud Versluys Proctor: Arnaud Versluys.
Discussed Shang Han Lun and the Jin Gui Yao Lue.
1. July 30, 2010 Round Table discussion on the Classics with Dr. Jun Zhang  Proctor: Dr. Jun Zhang.
Discussed Yin and Yang in the Nei Jing

 

Channel Palpation Clinical Rounds

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Cosmology, Philosophy & Medicine: "Nurturing the Fetus" in Early Medieval China & Women's Pathology and Therapy In Early Medieval China

Women's Pathology and Therapy In Early Medieval China

 

 

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Database Created: June, 2006 |  | Last Updated: September 28th, 2016


 

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In Memory of Hok Pang Tang L.Ac.
Born: June 1st, 1941
Deceased: January 21, 2006

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