The knowledge base for Chinese medicine is incredibly vast.

There are thousands of medical texts which were written in the time span of the Han to the Qing Dynasties.

These books make up the core knowledge of pre-modern Chinese medicine.

Sadly, many of these books have not been translated into English, and there are thousands which never will be.

This is no small feat, as each small to medium text takes a translator at least a year to translate, and larger texts take even longer.

This is a labor of love, born from the desire to read the material that our teachers have read, and to drink from the source.

Our mission is to translate these texts in a literal way.

Most scholars will agree that a literal translation is the starting point for texts where the source material is in a different language.

Once a literal translation has been created, and is on the market, then it is up to our community to tease out the layered meanings within the text.

There are several ways that you the reader can help us reach our lofty goals, which we believe will greatly increase the resources for those interested in Chinese medicine.

First: A subscription to our Chinese Medicine Database helps pay our translators to translate texts which have never been translated before.

The Data within these texts is then searchable in Chinese or in English.

Second: We have published twelve books to date, and they are:

Bèi Jí Qiān Jīn Yào Fāng 備急千金要方 Essential Prescriptions Worth a Thousand in Gold For Every Emergency by Sūn Sīmiǎo 孫思邈 (Volume II - IV) Translated by Sabine Wilms Out of Print

The Jīn Guì Fāng Gē Kuò 金匱方歌括 Formulas from the Golden Cabinet with Songs by Chén Xiūyuán 陳修園 (Volume I - III) Translated by Sabine Wilms

The Zhēn Jiǔ Dà Chéng 針灸大成 The Great Compendium of Acupuncture & Moxibustion by Yáng Jìzhōu 楊繼洲 (Volume I) Translated by Sabine Wilms

The Zhēn Jiǔ Dà Chéng 針灸大成 The Great Compendium of Acupuncture & Moxibustion by Yáng Jìzhōu 楊繼洲 (Volume V) Translated by Lorraine Wilcox

The Zhēn Jiǔ Dà Chéng 針灸大成 The Great Compendium of Acupuncture & Moxibustion by Yáng Jìzhōu 楊繼洲 (Volume VIII) Translated by Yue Lu

The Zhēn Jiǔ Dà Chéng 針灸大成 The Great Compendium of Acupuncture & Moxibustion by Yáng Jìzhōu 楊繼洲 (Volume IX) Translated by Lorraine Wilcox

Raising the Dead and Returning Life: Emergency Medicine of the Qing Dynasty Translated by Lorraine Wilcox

The Zhēn Jiǔ Zī Shēng Jīng 針灸資生經 The Classic of Supporting Life with Acupuncture and Moxibustion Vol. I-III Translated by Yue Lu

The Jīn Guì Fāng Gē Kuò 金匱方歌括 Formulas from the Golden Cabinet with Songs by Chén Xiūyuán 陳修園 (Volume IV - VI) Translated by Eran Even

The Zhēn Jiǔ Zī Shēng Jīng 《針灸資生經》 The Classic of Supporting Life with Acupuncture and Moxibustion by Wáng Zhízhōng 王執中 (Vol. IV-VII) Translated by Yue Lu

The Nǚ Yī Zá Yán 《女醫雜言》 The Miscellaneous Records of a Female Doctor by Tán Yǔnxián 談允賢 Translated by Lorraine Wilcox

The Nǚ Kē Cuò Yào 《女科撮要》 The Outline of Female Medicine by Xuē Jǐ 薛己 Translated by Lorraine Wilcox

These books can be found at our own store, as well as Amazon, the Journal of Chinese Medicine, Naturmed, and China Books

The purchase of these books helps us continue to translate and offer our community regular releases of never before translated books.

Lastly, tell your friends and peers about us. Only by doing this as a community will we really be able to make a critical mass, where we are able to accomplish a massive amount in our lifetimes!

We appreciate you our users, and our readers. Thank you for visiting out website.



 

2016 - 2018
Chinese Medicine Database Lecture Series

March 29, 2017 7:00pm to 9:00pm pst | 2 PDA's | 2 CA CEU's

Systematic Differentiation of Warm Disease
(Wēn Bing Tiáo Biàn 溫病條辨)


Systematic Differentiation of Warm Disease (Wēn Bing Tiáo Biàn
溫病條辨) is one of the foundational texts of the important warm
disease current in Chinese medicine. Its theories have guided
clinical practice for over two hundred years and its formulas are
among the most commonly used today. Such famous formulas as
Yín Qiào Sǎn and Sāng Jú Yǐn originate in this book, but few
practitioners have studied the original text—particularly
outside of East Asia.

In this lecture we will explore the second section of
this book that describes upper burner warm disease patterns
and includes its most frequently used formulas and the
most commonly seen warm disease patterns in the clinic.
We will also discuss the basic principles of diagnosing
and treating warm diseases and how they differ from
other illnesses. Examining the original lines of the text
not only clarifies how to use these important formulas,
it also provides valuable experience in studying and applying
premodern medical texts. Participants will leave the workshop
with an improved understanding of the clinical management of
basic warm diseases and a strong foundation for further studies
of warm disease theory or other classically-inspired
approaches to treatment.

What you will expect to learn:
1. Upper burner warm disease patterns.
2. The most frequently used formulas and the most commonly
seen warm disease patterns in the clinic.
3. The basic principles of diagnosing and treating warm
diseases and how they differ from other illnesses.
 

Live Streaming Only

Buy your Ticket Now!
 
Lecture by Stephen Boyanton
 
April 27, 2017 7:00pm to 9:00pm pst | 2 PDA's | 2 CA CEU's


Using a Multi-Layered Three Dimensional Channel Model
in Acupuncture to Treat Pain and External Disorders


The Neijing Su Wen makes the point that, when using acupuncture,
we should treat diseases where they are or risk poor results or
the potential worsening of a patient's disease.

With its roots in the teachings of the Huang Di Nei Jing Su Wen
and Ling Shu this short lecture discusses the use of the various
channels layers and techniques to do so from Minute Luo vessels,
sinew channels, to primary channels and their
specific treatment strategies.

What you will expect to learn:
1. Understanding the importance in treating problems with the
correct channel system based on the location of the disorder.
2. Improving the ability to diagnose disease in the superficial
channel layers.
3. Improving treatment strategies for the Luo, sinew, and
primary channels.
 

Live Streaming Only

Buy your Ticket Now!
 
Lecture by Jack Schaefer L.Ac.

Hover your mouse over the lecture name to get a detailed description.
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Description When Price Token
12. March 29th, 2017 Streaming Lecture with Stephen Boyanton Systematic Differentiation of Warm Disease (Wēn Bing Tiáo Biàn 溫病條辨) Systematic Differentiation of Warm Disease (Wēn Bing Tiáo Biàn 溫病條辨) is one of the foundational texts of the important warm disease current in Chinese medicine. Its theories have guided clinical practice for over two hundred years and its formulas are among the most commonly used today. Such famous formulas as Yín Qiào Sǎn and Sāng Jú Yǐn originate in this book, but few practitioners have studied the original text—particularly outside of East Asia. In this lecture we will explore the second section of this book that describes upper burner warm disease patterns and includes its most frequently used formulas and the most commonly seen warm disease patterns in the clinic. We will also discuss the basic principles of diagnosing and treating warm diseases and how they differ from other illnesses. Examining the original lines of the text not only clarifies how to use these important formulas, it also provides valuable experience in studying and applying premodern medical texts. Participants will leave the workshop with an improved understanding of the clinical management of basic warm diseases and a strong foundation for further studies of warm disease theory or other classically-inspiredapproaches to treatment.
2017-03-29 $40.00
11. March 2, 2017 Streaming Only Lecture with Roy Upton Herbal quality control issues for practitioners and the American Herbal Pharmacopoeia with Roy Upton. Quality control of herbal products is an essential component of a successful herbal medicine practice. Current federal regulations authorize the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to require all those manufacturing herbal products to ensure the identity, purity, and quality of the products they produce. FDA has to date not required full good manufacturing practices (GMP) compliance for practitioners or those with dispensaries. The American Herbal Pharmacopoeia (AHP), produces monographs, documents, and training seminars that establish quality standards that can be employed by anyone involved in herbal ingredient dispensing addressing all aspects of identity and purity from wildcrafted herbal materials to raw materials procured from suppliers. This presentation will address the basics of GMPs as applied to herbal ingredients and give specific focus to what practitioners can do to ensure that FDA continues to exercise their regulatory discretion in not applying federally mandated GMPs to practitioners. This presentation should be of interest to anyone custom formulating herbal products for their patient, whether mixing bulk herbs or tinctures.
2017-03-02 $40.00
10. October 27th, 2016 Streaming Only Lecture with Jason Robertson L.Ac. In this Chinese Medicine Database Lecture, we will explore the relationship of the channels (jīng luò 經絡) to Yangsheng/Life Nourishing (yǎng shēng 養生) techniques. For this discussion, we will focus on possible classical models for conceptualizing the physiological effects of life nourishing practice. A model will be considered through analysis of textual discussions of the acupuncture channels and points followed by considerations of the implications of the term 'yīng/ 應' often translated as 'resonance'. By developing conceptual tools for understanding how early physicians may have understood the mechanisms set in motion by beneficial lifestyle change, modern practitioners of acupuncture can gain useful tools for patient education and motivation.
2016-10-27 $40.00
9. September 28th, 2016 Lecture with Arnaud Versluys Ph.D., L.Ac. During this seminar, Dr. Versluys will present the first chapter of the Jingui Yaolue, line by line, with commentary and explanation. The first chapter is the general introduction to Jingui thought and clinical procedure and convers topics ranging from herbal flavor therapeutics, to Han dynasty disease categorization, diagnosis by visual inspection, disease progression and treatment sequence, etc. Dr. Versluys will cross-reference passages from the Huangdi Neijing, as well as introduce his own lineage’s interpretation of the various clauses of the text. Completion of said seminar will allow the student to gain a better insight in Jingui Yaolue thought and health/disease philosophy. Students will be introduced to approaching herbal medicine from a five flavor/ five phases methodology; and finally students will gain better insight into the combination of treatment modalities, and sequencing of treatment strategies for complex diseases.
2016-09-28 $40.00
8. August 24th, 2016 Lecture with Darren Tellier R.Ac. Chinese Medicine Interpretations of Current Psychotherapy Concepts Related to Trauma and Recovery Darren Tellier is a professor of Chinese medicine at MacEwan University in Edmonton, Canada. He will be giving the following two hour lecture in person, and also will be talking about a topic I am curious about which is: How circadian rhythms are changed with Chinese medicine, what a circadian rhythm change looks like as pathology. Chinese Medicine is not unfamiliar with shock as a pathogenic influence. Various contemporary authors and translators have provided analysis of shock in terms of Zang--‐Fu organs systems disharmonies, Elemental disturbance, and Vital Substance damage. These interpretations, while insightful, often do not delineate between the different physiological reactions that are related to shock and trauma; such as the differences between fight, flight, and freeze states. Current psychotherapy concepts of trauma suggest that the mind--‐body gets “stuck” when traumatic material is unprocessed, creating a state of autonomic dysregulation. Such concepts should compel us to develop Chinese Medicine interpretations of dysregulation and the “stuck” state. For example, is there a specific pattern discrimination that accurately describes the freeze response, or does the body get caught in the state it was in during the initial trauma? How should we quantify and qualify mind--‐body dysregulation, and the stuck state? This purpose of this presentation is to provide preliminary Chinese Medicine models for these states, as well as promote discussion, debate, and further investigation into shock and trauma.
2016-08-24 $40.00
7. July 27th, 2016 Streaming and Live Lecture with Michael Brown The aim of this lecture is to discuss key concepts to Chinese medicine in pre-Huangdi Neijing texts. Key terms we will discuss are yin, yang, qi, the four seasons, and the five elements. We will discuss a variety of texts such as Guanzi, Huainanzi, Chunqiu Fanlu, and relate them to the concepts in the Huangdi Neijing. The writing that exists prior to the Neijing is the background narrative to the writing of the Neijing. What is discussed in these earlier texts fundamentally influenced the final product which we now know as the Neijing, therefore by reading these documents, we can achieve a deeper level of clarity into the profound part of Chinese medicine.
2016-07-27 $10.00
5. July 9th, 2016 Streaming and Live Lecture with Tim Ross L.Ac., Ph.D. Part I Cultivation, Harvest and Processing of Common Chinese Medicinal Herbs Focus on 12 of the most commonly used Chinese herbs - Huang Qin, Dang Shen, Huang Qi, Dang Gui, Bai Shao, Gui Zhi, Da Zao, Gan Cao, Gan Jiang, Bai Zhu, Da Huang, and Ban Xia. For each herb we will detail the following - First Appearance, Archetypical Classical Formula(s), Origin, Production Region, Climate, Soil, Light, Water, Propagation, Field Management, Cultivation length, Harvest, Processing, Major Features of Medicinal Material, and Key Points in Organoleptic Assessment.
2016-07-09 $60.00
6. July 9th, 2016 Streaming and Live Lecture with Tim Ross L.Ac., Ph.D. Part II Cultivation, Harvest and Processing of Common Chinese Medicinal Herbs Focus on 12 of the most commonly used Chinese herbs - Huang Qin, Dang Shen, Huang Qi, Dang Gui, Bai Shao, Gui Zhi, Da Zao, Gan Cao, Gan Jiang, Bai Zhu, Da Huang, and Ban Xia. For each herb we will detail the following - First Appearance, Archetypical Classical Formula(s), Origin, Production Region, Climate, Soil, Light, Water, Propagation, Field Management, Cultivation length, Harvest, Processing, Major Features of Medicinal Material, and Key Points in Organoleptic Assessment.
2016-07-09 $60.00
4. July 6th, 2016 Streaming Lecture with Tim Ross L.Ac., Ph.D. The Traditional Roots of Chinese Herbal Alchemy Cultivation and Processing from a Jing Fang Perspective: Di Huang and Fu Zi Di Huang and Fu Zi are featured prominently in the classical formulas. To preserve the traditional structure-function relationships between these herbs and their designated therapeutic targets, it is necessary to preserve the traditional methods for cultivation, harvest and processing of these materials. To that end, Dr. Ross will present each herb’s earliest appearance in the Ben Cao literature, archetypical classical formulas, botanical and geographic origin, modern production regions, climate soil light water requirements, propagation methods, field management, cultivation length, harvest time, post-harvest processing methods, major macroscopic features for identification, key points for organoleptic assessment, historical pao zhi methods, commonly used modern pao zhi methods, reason for and result of pao zhi from both a chemical and therapeutic perspective. All of this material is taken directly from primary Chinese language sources while at the same time being infused with Dr. Ross’ own personal experiences of growing, harvesting, processing and prescribing these herbs.
2016-07-06 $40.00
3. May 25th 2016 Lecture with Jonathan Schell L.Ac. Unique Perspectives on the Jin Gui Yao Lue: Chapter 1. A reading and discussion of Jin Gui Yao Lue 金匱要略 Chapter 1 from the perspectives of Zhang Zhicong 張志聰, the Su Wen 素問, the Ling Shu 靈樞, the Lei Jing 類經, the Nan Jing 難經, the Zhu Bing Yuan Hou Lun 諸病源侯論, and the Mai Jing 脈經, as well as several other commentators on the Jin Gui. As part of this discussion we will take a deep look into the following: Five phase theory according to the Jin Gui Yao Lue. Disease progression through the five phases until finally reaching death from the perspective of the Jin Gui. The numerous different textual perspectives regarding the above documents and how they pertain to this chapter.
2016-05-25 $40.00
2. April 21st, 2016 Lecture with Eric Brand L.Ac. Farm to Pharmacy: Issues of Cultivation and Ecology in Chinese Medicine Issues affecting Chinese herbal quality control have attracted tremendous media attention in recent years, particularly regarding contaminants such as pesticide residues, heavy metals and aristolochic acid. This lecture explores the current situation in Chinese medicine with regard to: Wild-crafted and cultivated herbs, GAP cultivation trends, and concerns with pesticides and heavy metals. The concept of “dao di” medicinal materials, medicinal authenticity and the influence of proper growing regions, harvesting methods and processing. Current challenges in the herbal market, including endangered species, aristolochic acid concerns, and commonly misidentified herbs.
2016-04-21 $40.00
1. March 30th, 2016 Lecture with Lorraine Wilcox L.Ac. Nuns, Widows, and Unmarried Girls A Discussion on the Health Effects of Female Celibacy from Ancient Chinese Sources. A thread exists in the Chinese medical literature regarding the health effects of female celibacy. The description of related symptoms began during the Han and the theory developed at least through the Ming dynasty. Resulting symptoms were viewed as due to unfulfilled longing for a partner or thwarted maternal instincts. In this class, we will examine the source texts, including theoretical discussions, signs and symptoms, herbal treatment, and case histories. Then we will discuss their clinical relevancy in the twenty-first century and the ways these ideas may need to be updated.
2016-03-30 $40.00
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In Memory of Hok Pang Tang L.Ac.
Born: June 1st, 1941
Deceased: January 21, 2006

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